Blog

The past few weeks have been busy: we’re fresh from our Text Mining Summit, which included a dedicated training session for users who wished to develop against the I2E Web Services API.

I also had the opportunity to go on site to a customer to provide some focused API training.

These sessions generated lots of interesting questions about automating processes from an administration perspective as well as a user perspective.

As I was presenting some high-level slides during the Text Mining Summit, I noted that I was mixing up put and post (and sometimes place and push!) in a way that is forgivable when using them as English verbs, but unhelpful when trying to explain a RESTful Web Service.

So after the Summit, I went back to our Developers Guide and back to my notes and started over, to create a helpful explanation of when you POST and when you PUT to the I2E Server.

Both PUT and POST are methods to transfer data to the server and there are some use cases when they can be used interchangeably.

One example of that is creating a new file called newfile.txt in the Source Data collection on the I2E server:

PUT url=http://i2eserver:8334/api;type=data/newfile.txt data=filecontent

POST url=http://i2eserver:8334/api;type=data/?base=newfile.txt data=filecontent
 

The end result will be the same in either case, but as you can see from the URL, the resource name is set differently:


The Linguamatics Text Mining Summit has become Linguamatics flagship US event over the past few years attracting a wide variety of attendees from Pharma, Biotech and Healthcare industries.

This year was no exception; the Summit drew a record crowd of over 85 attendees and a fantastic line up of speakers including: AMIA, Shire Pharmaceuticals, Huntsman Cancer Institute, AstraZeneca, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Merck, Georgetown University Medical Center, UNC Charlotte, City of Hope, Pfizer and Roche.

The Summit took place at the Hyatt Regency, Newport, Rhode Island in the beautiful surroundings of the Narragansett bay from October 7-9, 2013.

Delegates were provided with an excellent opportunity to explore trends in text mining and analytics, natural language processing and knowledge discovery.

Delegates discovered how I2E is delivering valuable intelligence from text in a range of applications, including the mining of scientific literature, news feeds, Electronic Health Records (EHRs), clinical trial data, FDA drug labels and more. Customer presentations demonstrated how I2E helps workers in knowledge driven organizations meet the challenge of information overload, maximize the value of their information assets and increase speed to insight.

One customer presentation explained how a “Recent I2E literature search saved $180K and 2-3 months [of] time”.


There’s only a few days to go until the Linguamatics Text Mining Summit, which begins on 7th October in Newport RI.

This is an opportunity for I2E users and other developers to get hands-on access to the new version of I2E — version 4.1 — as well as attend a variety of interesting presentations and a number of training sessions.

This year, there is a training session dedicated to I2E Administration and use of the Web Services API. You can meet up with individuals from other organizations who will share their experiences with our API, along with training material that covers the various parts of the API in sufficient details to start using it yourself.

There will also be a case study on using the API to create workflows that integrate text mining. And, of course, lots of demos!

I look forward to seeing you there!

Paul


I2E 4.1 opens up new opportunities for connecting actionable insights from unstructured data across diverse cloud and enterprise-based content silos

(Cambridge, England and Boston, USA – September 19, 2013 ) -Linguamatics, the leader in natural language processing-based text mining and analytics, is pleased to announce the latest release of its award-winning software platform, I2E. Version 4.1 provides enhancements in a number of key areas, including more streamlined access to content through linking enterprise servers with content servers in the cloud, and enhanced chemical querying capabilities.

I2E’s new Linked Server functionality facilitates easier access to text mining across different content silos wherever they might be located, whether in-house data or content served from the cloud, including from Linguamatics’ own I2EOnDemand platform. This federated approach will enable faster linking of extracted information from diverse unstructured data sources such as scientific literature, clinical data, patents and in-house information, leading to increased speed to insight.

I2E’s enhanced chemical querying capability introduces faster, more scalable substructure and similarity searching within the context of sophisticated natural language queries, and integrates chemical structure drawing, using chemistry components from ChemAxon.

Amongst other product enhancements, index optimization delivers reductions in index sizes of around 30%, leading to savings in storage costs. This is particularly significant as customers scale up their enterprise text mining operations to deal with the challenges of big data.


Natural Language Processing (NLP), big data and precision medicine are three of the hottest topics in healthcare at the moment and consequently attracted a large audience to the first NLP & Big Data Symposium, focussed on precision medicine.

The event took place on August 27th, hosted at the new UCSF site at Mission Bay in San Francisco and sponsored by Linguamatics and UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Over 75 delegates came to hear the latest insights and projects from some of the West Coast’s leading institutions including Kaiser Permanente, Oracle, Huntsman Cancer Institute and UCSF.

The event was held in the midst of an explosion in new building development to house the latest in medical research and informatics, something that big data will be at the heart of.

Linguamatics and UCSF recognized the need for a meeting on NLP in the west and put together an exciting program that clearly caught the imagination of many groups in the area.

 

Over 75 delegates attended the Symposium

Key presentations included: