In the rapidly evolving fight against COVID-19, IQVIA is committed to deploying our resources and capabilities to help everyone in healthcare do what needs to be done, and to keep things moving forward. Pharmaceutical and healthcare organizations, governments, and the broader scientific communities around the world are working to assess the impact of the virus, and how this can be tackled.

As part of this effort, it’s critical to have access to the best evidence from a broad range of data, including scientific literature, clinical trials and other textual sources. For intelligence from unstructured text, Linguamatics can help. Our Natural Language Processing (NLP) technology enables fast, systematic, and comprehensive insight generation from unstructured text. These sources can include scientific literature, clinical trial records, preprints, internal sources, social media, and news. Capturing key information from these many sources and synthesizing into one place – an Evidence Hub – gives users a deeper understanding of everything that’s going on. This approach can speed answers to key questions to confront the COVID-19 pandemic, such as:


Until recently I kept hearing claims such as, “Vaping is so much better for you than smoking…” My response is “It’s just a matter of time before the data will let us know”. Turns out the data is starting to speak, and it doesn’t have a positive outlook on the matter. Vaping is really in its infancy, and research even more so. We are still discovering which additives are in which types of vaping cartridges. Let’s compare vaping to tobacco: the Cancer Council in Australia reports that tobacco has been grown in the Americas for nearly 8,000 years, and the first significant medical reports weren’t out until the 1950s and 1960s. Relatively speaking we are early to this arena. Fast forward to the present where we know cigarettes have over 4,000 chemicals, 70 of which are known carcinogens.


It Takes a Village to Raise Modern Medicine

Learning from the past

“It takes a village to raise a child” is a popular old African proverb, that in my opinion has a lot of merit. Now that single parents are part of the mainstream, as well as divorced families, and other non-traditional parenting units and methods are adopted; it’s still very important for the nurturing and development to come from many different influences- especially those that are closest. I also believe this old proverb can be applied to not just childrearing, but in other areas, such as how we work together and adopt new methods to make healthcare better.


It is well known that the drug discovery and development process is lengthy, expensive and prone to failure. Starting from the selection of a novel target in discovery, through the multiple steps to regulatory approval, the overall probability of success is less than 1%.

One factor is that the majority of diseases are multifaceted, hence the challenge is identifying the most appropriate patient populations who will respond to specific interventions. A stratified approach has proven beneficial in a number of cancers and genetic diseases, and pharmaceutical companies have a strong interest in understanding how to find the sub-populations of patients to ensure the most appropriate therapies are tested in clinical trials, and applied in broader clinical use.

The ultimate aim of a stratified approach to medicine is to enable healthcare professionals to provide the “right treatment, for the right person, at the right dose, at the right time”; and there are many research initiatives (governmental, private, public) on-going to develop the appropriate knowledge and models.


Physicians at breaking point

Unsurprisingly, physicians who are constantly under peak pressure have the highest rate of burnout with an average of 45.8%. However, the source states emergency physicians claim a whopping 60% burnout rate. I also recently received an unverified Tweet about the life expectancy for physicians in this specialty, and the news just gets worse. It’s almost 20 years less than other specialties. I am unsure if it’s that much however, if you have ever ventured into an emergency department you can see for yourself why this may be true.